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Aviation on Path to Recovery as Data Shows more Aircraft Leaving Storage

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As air travel slowly shapes its journey back to recovery from the pandemic, the main focus now shifts to addressing post COVID-19 challenges.

The latest tracking data from CH-Aviation shows a positive uptick in the active global fleet. Global aviation has seen a positive trajectory for five months in a row with the total number of aicraft globally currently at 27,790 aircraft. Of these, 21,135 aircraft were recorded in active service with the number of grounded aircraft having dropped to 6,655.

Compared to May 2021 CH-Aviation reveals that the number of active aircraft has increased by 5%, while the number of grounded aircraft has decreased by 12%.

Asia-Pacific leads the count with 7,446 aircraft – not to be forgotten is that they were the first to be impacted by the pandemic – North America follows with 6,577 active aicraft. Europe and Africa then follow with 4,861 and 781 active aircraft respectively while South America and Oceania are trailing with 782 and 650 active aircraft respectively.

Among the Top 10 countries with the most active aircraft are China, Poland, Japan, Ethiopia, the Russian Federation, the United States of America, New Zealand, Hungary and Ireland, while countries with the most inactive aircraft include Malaysia, Thailand, Nigeria, Viet Nam, the United Kingdom, the Philippines, Iran, Canada and South Africa.

While the increase of the active fleet shows a positive development of the industry, the average utilization for those aircraft still remains to be a huge challenge for their operators.

Airlines while intent establishing a “confidence factor” to win over more of the travelling public are faced with the risk of government lockdowns and ever changing restrictions on travel which have an impact on the recovery of the industry.

Moreover, as they are facing a rather tricky restart, there has been a need to stimulate demand through relatively low fares but with no end in sight for the covid pandemic, they will only be able to recover their costs if and when the industry strengthens significantly.

Image via DW by @steve Strike

By Victor Shalton Odhiambo

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